Quality over quantity is this brand's motto. If you have great gear that can hold up to intense workouts and lots of laundry sessions, then you don’t need a ton of it. Fourlaps uses odor-resistant, moisture wicking technology in all of its fabrics. The brand's “Level Collection” fabric even has the ability to allow heat to escape when you sweat, while trapping in the warmth when the weather gets chilly.
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Despite the acceptance of fashionable sportswear as a form of casual dressing in French fashion in the 1920s, the American garment industry went on to become the most prominent producers of such clothing.[12] The key difference between French and American sportswear was that French sportswear was usually a small part of a high-end designer's output, while the American sportswear designers focused on affordable, versatile, easy-care garments that could be mass-produced and were relevant to the customer's lifestyle, enabling the modern, increasingly emancipated woman to dress herself without a maid's assistance.[10] Although the influence of Europe, particularly Parisian high fashion and English tailoring, was always significant, the Great Depression which started in 1929 acted as a trigger to encourage American fashion to focus on homegrown style and design - particularly sportswear.[8] With 13 million Americans left unemployed by the Depression, it was necessary to create jobs and reduce the competition from imported goods in order to improve the American economy.[6] At the same time, the growth of female athleticism and increased female employment fueled a need for simpler and less expensive clothing.[6][17]
Quand vous pensez à un sweat, qu’est-ce qui vous vient à l’esprit? Que ce soit un sweat capuchon décontracté à enfiler le matin pour promener votre chien ou un sweat ras-du-cou imprimé à la fois tendance et parfaitement confortable pour une fraîche soirée d’automne, vous pouvez pousser votre look un cran plus haut grâce à la sélection diversifiée de Simons. Parcourez une variété de styles, de couleurs et de marques et étoffez votre garde-robe avec des pièces qui rehausseront vos tenues décontractées. Avec tous ces choix branchés à portée de main, vous pouvez enfin abandonner ce vieux sweat qui date du secondaire.
Quality over quantity is this brand's motto. If you have great gear that can hold up to intense workouts and lots of laundry sessions, then you don’t need a ton of it. Fourlaps uses odor-resistant, moisture wicking technology in all of its fabrics. The brand's “Level Collection” fabric even has the ability to allow heat to escape when you sweat, while trapping in the warmth when the weather gets chilly.
The curator Richard Martin put on an exhibition on sportswear in 1985 at the Fashion Institute of Technology, in which he described sportswear as "an American invention, an American industry, and an American expression of style."[4] For Martin, American sportswear was an expression of various predominantly middle-class aspects of American culture, including health ideals, the concept of democracy, ideas of comfort and function, and innovative design which might refer to historical concepts or leisure attributes.[4] The establishment of a five-day working week and an eight-hour working day in America in the mid-20th century led to the need for clothing which enabled the fullest possible enjoyment of such increased leisure time, and was designed accordingly.[4] A subsequent exhibition of 1930s-70s sportswear, also curated by Martin, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1998, was introduced by Philippe de Montebello as showing pioneering garments, whose modesty, comparative simplicity, and wearability treated fashion as a "pragmatic art."[5] de Montebello carefully explained how significant American designers such as Norman Norell, Pauline Trigère, Charles James and Mainbocher, were not considered sportswear designers, as they were not dedicated to the design principles of versatility, accessibility and affordability in the way that Claire McCardell or Emily Wilkens were.[5]
Chances are you’re intimately familiar with this mega-brand if you’re a gym rat, athlete, or even if you don't watch sports on the regular. But there’s a good reason that it’s the top dog in sports. That means the brand is always innovating with new technologies like Flyknit and Dri-FIT, which keep getting upgraded and integrated into more of its stellar gear.
Among the key designs produced by this new generation of American designers were capsule wardrobes such as McCardell's group of five wool jersey pieces from 1934, comprising two tops, long and short skirts, and a pair of culottes; and Maxwell's "weekend wardrobe" of five tweed and flannel garments. Both were designed to accommodate formal and informal occasions depending on how they were assembled and accessorised.[22] McCardell also became well known for designs such as the Monastic and Popover dresses which were versatile enough to work in multiple contexts from swimsuit cover-ups to party dresses.[22][25] Other McCardell signatures included ballet slippers (made by Ben Sommers of Capezio) as everyday footwear and functional pockets in skirts and trousers.[22][26] Dressy garments made from casual fabrics, such as McCardell and Joset Walker's evening dresses and dress-and-coat ensembles made out of cotton, became a key sportswear look.[22] The American couturier Norman Norell declared that McCardell could make a smart dress to wear anywhere out of "five dollars worth of common cotton calico."[22] Other sportswear designs often incorporated elements of sporty informal or casual wear, as exemplified by Clare Potter's evening sweater worn with a long skirt draped like a sidesaddle riding habit.[27]
“I’m a fan of minimalism and understatement. No Bull apparel and shoes are not flashy, yet have a bold, unique design with quality material that doesn’t intrude on your performance. Living in a time where your appearance and activities often reflect your values and identity, I strongly identify with the brand’s message of no BS and putting in the work. I feel their products inspire and allow you to do just that.”
Ever been working out and have your cell phone crash to the ground from a loose pocket, or ever had to place your phone on the ground because your shorts or pants don’t even have a pocket to begin with. This brand saw a gap in the market and filled it—men’s compression shorts and pant with sweat-proof pockets made to securely stash your cell phone. While their shorts and leggings are most popular, they also make tops, too.
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