George is the exclusive clothing brand at Walmart. George is fashionable, affordable and has styles for all areas of your life. Whether it’s during the week at work, or relaxing on the weekends, George at Walmart makes shopping for essentials simple. Walmart also carries a variety of popular brands in addition to George, so you can shop a variety of styles in one place.


Despite the acceptance of fashionable sportswear as a form of casual dressing in French fashion in the 1920s, the American garment industry went on to become the most prominent producers of such clothing.[12] The key difference between French and American sportswear was that French sportswear was usually a small part of a high-end designer's output, while the American sportswear designers focused on affordable, versatile, easy-care garments that could be mass-produced and were relevant to the customer's lifestyle, enabling the modern, increasingly emancipated woman to dress herself without a maid's assistance.[10] Although the influence of Europe, particularly Parisian high fashion and English tailoring, was always significant, the Great Depression which started in 1929 acted as a trigger to encourage American fashion to focus on homegrown style and design - particularly sportswear.[8] With 13 million Americans left unemployed by the Depression, it was necessary to create jobs and reduce the competition from imported goods in order to improve the American economy.[6] At the same time, the growth of female athleticism and increased female employment fueled a need for simpler and less expensive clothing.[6][17]

Sportswear originally described activewear - clothing made specifically for sport. Part of the evolution of sportswear was triggered by 19th-century developments in female activewear, such as early bathing or cycling costumes, which demanded shorter skirts, bloomers, and other specific garments to enable mobility, whilst sports such as tennis or croquet could be played in barely-modified conventional dress.[4] One of the first couturiers to specialise in sports-specific clothing was the British John Redfern who in the 1870s began designing tailored garments for increasingly active women who rode, played tennis, went yachting, and did archery. Redfern's clothes, although intended for specific sporting pursuits, were adopted as everyday wear by his clients, making him probably the first sportswear designer.[7] Also in the late nineteenth century, garments associated with activewear and/or modified from menswear, such as the shirtwaist began to form part of the working woman's wardrobe.[8] Prior to 1920, men and women could both demonstrate their being at leisure simply by removing a jacket, either literally in the case of menswear, or metaphorically by a woman wearing a shirtwaist blouse that resembled a man's shirt worn without a jacket.[4]

 Nike Obey Only & Sons Outcome Ovadia & Sons Paragraph Penfield Plenty Humanwear Polo Ralph Lauren Project X Paris Publish Puma Reebok Classic Reigning Champ Represent Rumors Russell Athletic Samsoe & Samsoe Saturdays New York City Scotch & Soda Smiley Stan Ray Stüssy Super Massive The Kooples The North Face Tommy Hilfiger Umbro Vans Versace Jeans Couture Volcom Wings+horns Wu Wear Y-3 Adidas

Sportswear has been called America's main contribution to the history of fashion design,[1] developed to cater to the needs of the increasingly fast-paced lifestyle of American women.[2] It started out as a fashion industry term describing informal and interchangeable separates (i.e., blouses, shirts, skirts and shorts),[2] and in the 1920s became a popular word for relaxed, casual wear typically worn for spectator sports.[1] Since the 1930s the term has been used to describe both day and evening fashions of varying degrees of formality that demonstrate this relaxed approach while remaining appropriate wear for many business or social occasions.[3]
After the Second World War, the emergence in Paris of the luxurious "New Look" popularised by Christian Dior, with its emphasis on accessorising and femininity, was in direct contrast to the relaxed, easy-wear American look.[26] Sally Kirkland, a fashion editor at Vogue and LIFE, noted that McCardell and others had already been thinking along the lines of longer and fuller skirts and fitted bodices, but that unlike Dior's heavily stiffened and corseted designs, they used bias-cut bodices and lightweight, easy-wear circle or pleated skirts to reproduce the same silhouette.[22] Unlike traditional made-to-measure French couture fashion, designed for specific silhouettes, American sportswear was designed to accommodate a variety of body shapes and enable freedom of movement.[26] With the lifting of fabric rationing and restrictions following the War, American designers were able to use unlimited fabric and the development of permanent pleating meant that pleated dresses and full skirts were easy to look after.[22] In addition to this, American stores had begun to recognise the commercial value of separates, with LIFE reporting in 1949 that separates made up an all-time-high of 30% of clothing sales in the States that Fall.[22]
Sportswear originally described activewear - clothing made specifically for sport. Part of the evolution of sportswear was triggered by 19th-century developments in female activewear, such as early bathing or cycling costumes, which demanded shorter skirts, bloomers, and other specific garments to enable mobility, whilst sports such as tennis or croquet could be played in barely-modified conventional dress.[4] One of the first couturiers to specialise in sports-specific clothing was the British John Redfern who in the 1870s began designing tailored garments for increasingly active women who rode, played tennis, went yachting, and did archery. Redfern's clothes, although intended for specific sporting pursuits, were adopted as everyday wear by his clients, making him probably the first sportswear designer.[7] Also in the late nineteenth century, garments associated with activewear and/or modified from menswear, such as the shirtwaist began to form part of the working woman's wardrobe.[8] Prior to 1920, men and women could both demonstrate their being at leisure simply by removing a jacket, either literally in the case of menswear, or metaphorically by a woman wearing a shirtwaist blouse that resembled a man's shirt worn without a jacket.[4]
Chances are you’re intimately familiar with this mega-brand if you’re a gym rat, athlete, or even if you don't watch sports on the regular. But there’s a good reason that it’s the top dog in sports. That means the brand is always innovating with new technologies like Flyknit and Dri-FIT, which keep getting upgraded and integrated into more of its stellar gear.

Un sweat est fait pour rendre vos temps libres aussi confortables que possible, mais ça ne veut pas dire que vous ne pouvez pas à la fois être élégant et suivre les dernières tendances. Les pulls à capuchon et les capuchons à zip sont intemporels et fonctionnels, alors que les tee-shirts ultralégers à capuche vous permettent d’exprimer votre côté créatif à travers des imprimés graphiques. Restez au chaud lors des soirées plus fraîches avec des sweats qui se coordonnent avec tout, des jeans skinny jusqu’aux leggings douillets. Vous n’avez pas non plus besoin de porter le même toutes les fins de semaine ; l’assortiment de Simons est en évolution constante pour rester en phase avec la mode. 
Last year was again a time of many changes for both ourselves and the industry that we work in. We have further consolidated our product lines at an unrelenting pace. In the fall of 2018 we published a dedicated 32 clearance book, it met with huge success and now we basically have left only a range of leather jackets and a range of sport bags to offer at greatly reduced prices. These can be found in our Clearance Section on the new website. As we go forward now with our core lines, Fruit of the Loom, Jerzee, Russell Athletic and King Athletics, we will be able to offer even more comprehensive and deep inventory to our customers. Russell Athletic has also made some major changes to their product offering, they no longer offer uniforms, and have condensed some of their other styles, the new sections for both stock and special order on this site will give you an up to date view on what is available. 2019 will be a year in which we will be able to offer not only a greater depth of inventory but also a renewed commitment to our industry. Many thanks for your continued support during 2018 and we wish you all the very best for the year ahead.
Whether the 411 comes from targeted posts on Facebook, influencers promoting on Instagram, or just a new logo on a slick pair of joggers that catches your eye at the gym, there seem to be a never ending amount of brands producing fitness clothing. And with specialty gear comes specialty prices—most of the newer brands are expensive to the point of being prohibitive, even though they've largely not been tried and tested by the general public. How can you know if you’ll regret shelling out the dough for a shirt one of your favorite follows was rocking on the 'Gram?
×