We decided to help narrow the playing field by asking some of our favorite fitness experts and trainers—you know, the guys who spend their days (and early mornings, and evenings, and sometimes even nights) decked out in activewear and athleisure. Who better to give you the truth about the best fitness gear? Here are pricey men’s activewear and athleisure brands that are worth the price tag, according to trainers and fitness pros.

“Lululemon gear is my favorite athleisure wear because, for starters, its as comfortable as can be. They are presentable and are fitted, so I can still look professional as a fitness professional. The 5 Year Basic Tee is one of my favorites because its super comfortable, but also a fitted t-shirt. It’s stretchy, so it hugs your body just right, and if it feels too tight, you can stretch it out a little before putting it on, and it will fit great.”
Alongside Dorothy Shaver, Eleanor Lambert was an important promoter of the American Look and sportswear. As founder of the Council of Fashion Designers of America and creator of New York Fashion Week, Lambert is considered the first fashion publicist.[28][29] In the summer of 1940, Lambert was hired by the Dress Institute to promote American fashion, leading to newspaper and magazine articles about how New York was replacing Paris as a global fashion leader.[29] In 1940, both Harper's Bazaar and Vogue published issues devoted to American fashion.[24][30]

Dress in the bright, handsome designs of men's clothing from Old Navy. Make an impression with a classic selection of men's clothing including dress, casual and seasonal styles. Enjoy a wide variety of men's clothing essentials featuring shirts, graphic tees, hoodies, pants, jeans, sweaters and outwear. Old Navy men's clothing is as durable as it is stylish. Look sharp in the handsome designs of men's clothing from Old Navy. Don't forget to check out our sister brand Gap, they have a wide selection of accessories,Gap suits, and much more.
†The Triangle Rewards Program is owned and operated by Canadian Tire Corporation, Limited. The Triangle credit cards are issued by Canadian Tire Bank. Rewards are in the form of electronic Canadian Tire Money® (CT Money®). To collect bonus CT Money you must present a Triangle Rewards card/key fob, or use any approved Cardless method, at time of purchase or pay with a Triangle credit card. You cannot collect paper CT Money on bonus offers. Any bonus multiplier is based on the base rate of collecting CT Money, and will be added to whatever the Member would otherwise collect, without the bonus. The 30X for Triangle credit card customers consists of the 10X everyday plus the 20X bonus. Not all items sold at Canadian Tire, Sport Chek and participating Mark's/L'Equipeur, Atmosphere and other partner locations are eligible to earn CT Money or to be redeemed for. Certain Mark's/L'Equipeur and Atmosphere stores may not participate. Conditions apply. Visit triangle.com for full program rules and Partner location information. The offered rate is exclusive of any bonus or promotional offers or redemption transactions. CT Money is collected on the pre-tax amount of the purchase. Bonus CT Money collected from online orders will be applied to the Member’s Triangle Rewards Account within 5 weeks of the purchase date.
“I’m a fan of minimalism and understatement. No Bull apparel and shoes are not flashy, yet have a bold, unique design with quality material that doesn’t intrude on your performance. Living in a time where your appearance and activities often reflect your values and identity, I strongly identify with the brand’s message of no BS and putting in the work. I feel their products inspire and allow you to do just that.”
The precursors of true sportswear emerged in New York before the Second World War.[2] Clare Potter and Claire McCardell were among the first American designers in the 1930s to gain name recognition through their innovative clothing designs, which Martin described as demonstrating "problem-solving ingenuity and realistic lifestyle applications".[10] Garments were designed to be easy-to-wear and comfortable, using practical fabrics such as denim, cotton, and jersey.[18] McCardell in particular has been described as America's greatest sportswear designer.[18] Her simple, practical clothes suited the relaxed American dress code, neither formal nor informal, that became established during the 1930s and 1940s.[2] McCardell once proclaimed: "I belong to a mass production country where any of us, all of us, deserve the right to good fashion."[19] Martin credits the 1930s and 40s sportswear designers with freeing American fashion from the need to copy Paris couture. Where Paris fashion was traditionally imposed onto the customer regardless of her wishes, American sportswear was democratic, widely available, and encouraged self-expression.[10] The early sportswear designers proved that the creation of original ready-to-wear fashion could be a legitimate design art which responded stylishly to utilitarian requirements.[10]
“I have multiple pairs of shorts, shirts, and tank tops from Rhone. I really enjoy their gear for going on runs or bootcamp-style classes, where I don't have to worry about them wearing from a barbell. They are comfortable, and have enough stretch in them that allows zero restriction. The clothing is presentable and fitted, which in my line of work really is helpful.”
“Outdoor Voices shorts are just the right length—gotta love split shorts to show off those running legs—and have all the pockets you ever need when you're out on a run. I can hold my MetroCard, cash, keys and gels without the shorts falling down. The brief liner is also super comfortable even when things get sweaty. The Merino Longsleeve T-Shirt is great for those colder mornings and later nights to keep you warm, but it’s also still breathable and wicks away moisture.”
Many of the first sportswear designers were women, including McCardell, Potter, Elizabeth Hawes, Emily Wilkens, Tina Leser, and Vera Maxwell. A common argument was that female designers projected their personal values into this new style.[10] One of the few male designers at this time was Tom Brigance, who by the late 1930s was regularly ranked alongside Potter as a leading name in mid-range priced sportswear.[20] Like Potter, Brigance understood how to design smart and fashionable clothing for mass-production, which made his clothes attractive to manufacturers as well as to customers.[20] Two other notable male designers of sportswear at this time were Sydney Wragge and John Weitz.[21]
Old Navy offers big men's activewear from expert designers in clothing for big men. Our big men's activewear is made from comfortable, lightweight fabrics. The masculine style and designer details in big men's activewear from this assortment makes it popular with active guys. Big men's activewear from Old Navy includes pants, shorts, shirts, jackets and more. Big men's activewear from this collection is great for jogging, exercise at the gym or for just doing weekend errands. Big men's activewear makes a great gift for all the guys on your gift list who love quality, comfort and fashion.
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