Last year was again a time of many changes for both ourselves and the industry that we work in. We have further consolidated our product lines at an unrelenting pace. In the fall of 2018 we published a dedicated 32 clearance book, it met with huge success and now we basically have left only a range of leather jackets and a range of sport bags to offer at greatly reduced prices. These can be found in our Clearance Section on the new website. As we go forward now with our core lines, Fruit of the Loom, Jerzee, Russell Athletic and King Athletics, we will be able to offer even more comprehensive and deep inventory to our customers. Russell Athletic has also made some major changes to their product offering, they no longer offer uniforms, and have condensed some of their other styles, the new sections for both stock and special order on this site will give you an up to date view on what is available. 2019 will be a year in which we will be able to offer not only a greater depth of inventory but also a renewed commitment to our industry. Many thanks for your continued support during 2018 and we wish you all the very best for the year ahead.
While 1920s Paris designers offered haute couture designs that could be considered sportswear, it was typically not their design focus.[10] A notable exception was the tennis player Jane Régny (the pseudonym of Madame Balouzet Tillard de Tigny), who opened a couture house specialising in clothing for sport and travel.[8][11][12] Another famous tennis player, Suzanne Lenglen, was director of the sportswear department at Jean Patou.[12] In contrast to the flexibility of American sportswear, these expensive couture garments were typically prescribed for very specific circumstances.[10][12] Many couturiers began designing clothing that, whilst suitable for sport, could be worn in a wider range of contexts.[12] Coco Chanel, who promoted her own active, financially independent lifestyle through relaxed jersey suits and uncluttered dresses, became famous for clothes of "the sports type."[8][13] In 1926 Harper's Bazaar reported upon Chanel's sporty garments, noting the absence of equivalent apparel from New York fashion presentations.[8] However, Martin has noted that while Chanel was undeniably important and influential, her work was always based on couture construction rather than the easy-wear nature of American sportswear.[4]
Like with clothing for men, there's a lot of interesting fashion possibilities with these garments. Look incredible at that wedding reception with a new suit and dress shirt from this line. Pair a cool light jacket with jeans and a great fitting t-shirt for a no nonsense outfit, perfect for playing pool with your buddies or taking your main squeeze to the movies. Start from scratch, or discover the right accessory to bring your favourite old look back to life. Clothing for men from Banana Republic is brilliantly designed to effortlessly go from day to night wear. Run for the last train on that hectic morning commute, run the office like a boss, and unwind with the gang at the local pub. With apparel for men from this line, you'll always be well-dressed.
In the 1970s Geoffrey Beene, one of the first significant male sportswear designers, incorporated relaxed layering and elements of menswear into his women's clothing - details that continue to widely influence early 21st century industry designers.[2] In 1970, Bill Blass, whose fashion career began in 1946, founded his own company, Bill Blass Limited.[42] Blass's wearable designs were designed to be worn day and night and he was said to have raised American sportswear to the highest possible level.[43] Like Beene, he introduced menswear touches to his sportswear, which was described as clean, modern and impeccable in style.[43] Kirkland commented in 1985 that sportswear designers such as Liz Claiborne and Joan Vass were no longer "borrowing from the boys," but had begun making menswear too.[22] In addition to the high-end names who produced apparel in large quantity, a more personal level of sportswear was offered in the early 1980s by smaller designers such as Mary Jane Marcasiano and Vass, who specialised in hand-knits in wool and cotton.[22] By the mid-1980s, sportswear had become a key part of the international fashion scene, forming a large part of America's contribution to the twice-yearly fashion presentations alongside top-end collections from Paris, Milan and London.[22]
“I enjoy wearing Lululemon gear. My favorite piece is their Metal Tech Vent long sleeve shirts. I'm a fan of long sleeve workout tops and this particular shirt fits perfectly around the body and arms. It allows me to move without any restriction and it also feels good—which are my top two most important qualifications for workout gear. Not to mention, I like how it looks on me.”

The precursors of true sportswear emerged in New York before the Second World War.[2] Clare Potter and Claire McCardell were among the first American designers in the 1930s to gain name recognition through their innovative clothing designs, which Martin described as demonstrating "problem-solving ingenuity and realistic lifestyle applications".[10] Garments were designed to be easy-to-wear and comfortable, using practical fabrics such as denim, cotton, and jersey.[18] McCardell in particular has been described as America's greatest sportswear designer.[18] Her simple, practical clothes suited the relaxed American dress code, neither formal nor informal, that became established during the 1930s and 1940s.[2] McCardell once proclaimed: "I belong to a mass production country where any of us, all of us, deserve the right to good fashion."[19] Martin credits the 1930s and 40s sportswear designers with freeing American fashion from the need to copy Paris couture. Where Paris fashion was traditionally imposed onto the customer regardless of her wishes, American sportswear was democratic, widely available, and encouraged self-expression.[10] The early sportswear designers proved that the creation of original ready-to-wear fashion could be a legitimate design art which responded stylishly to utilitarian requirements.[10]
Before co-founding the business that later became Missoni with his bride Rosita in 1953, Ottavio Missoni, himself an athlete, and his teammate Giorgio Oberweger had an activewear business in Trieste making wool tracksuits christened Venjulia suits.[48] The success of the Venjulia suits, which took into account the need of athletes for functional, warm garments enabling freedom of movement, led to their being worn by the 1948 Italian Olympics team (which included Missoni himself).[49] In the 1960s Missoni became renowned for their uniquely colored, mix-and-match knitwear separates based upon activewear,[50] which have remained desirable and fashionable well into the 21st century.[51]
Sportswear originally described activewear - clothing made specifically for sport. Part of the evolution of sportswear was triggered by 19th-century developments in female activewear, such as early bathing or cycling costumes, which demanded shorter skirts, bloomers, and other specific garments to enable mobility, whilst sports such as tennis or croquet could be played in barely-modified conventional dress.[4] One of the first couturiers to specialise in sports-specific clothing was the British John Redfern who in the 1870s began designing tailored garments for increasingly active women who rode, played tennis, went yachting, and did archery. Redfern's clothes, although intended for specific sporting pursuits, were adopted as everyday wear by his clients, making him probably the first sportswear designer.[7] Also in the late nineteenth century, garments associated with activewear and/or modified from menswear, such as the shirtwaist began to form part of the working woman's wardrobe.[8] Prior to 1920, men and women could both demonstrate their being at leisure simply by removing a jacket, either literally in the case of menswear, or metaphorically by a woman wearing a shirtwaist blouse that resembled a man's shirt worn without a jacket.[4]
Quality over quantity is this brand's motto. If you have great gear that can hold up to intense workouts and lots of laundry sessions, then you don’t need a ton of it. Fourlaps uses odor-resistant, moisture wicking technology in all of its fabrics. The brand's “Level Collection” fabric even has the ability to allow heat to escape when you sweat, while trapping in the warmth when the weather gets chilly.
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