†The Triangle Rewards Program is owned and operated by Canadian Tire Corporation, Limited. The Triangle credit cards are issued by Canadian Tire Bank. Rewards are in the form of electronic Canadian Tire Money® (CT Money®). To collect bonus CT Money you must present a Triangle Rewards card/key fob, or use any approved Cardless method, at time of purchase or pay with a Triangle credit card. You cannot collect paper CT Money on bonus offers. Any bonus multiplier is based on the base rate of collecting CT Money, and will be added to whatever the Member would otherwise collect, without the bonus. The 30X for Triangle credit card customers consists of the 10X everyday plus the 20X bonus. Not all items sold at Canadian Tire, Sport Chek and participating Mark's/L'Equipeur, Atmosphere and other partner locations are eligible to earn CT Money or to be redeemed for. Certain Mark's/L'Equipeur and Atmosphere stores may not participate. Conditions apply. Visit triangle.com for full program rules and Partner location information. The offered rate is exclusive of any bonus or promotional offers or redemption transactions. CT Money is collected on the pre-tax amount of the purchase. Bonus CT Money collected from online orders will be applied to the Member’s Triangle Rewards Account within 5 weeks of the purchase date.
For the Triangle Mastercard only: If you are not approved for a card at the above rates, Canadian Tire Bank may still issue you a card at the following annual interest rates: (i) if you are a resident of Quebec, 22.99% for all charges; or (ii) if you reside outside of Quebec, 25.99% for all charges (excluding cash transactions and related fees) and 27.99% for cash transactions and related fees.
“Lululemon gear is my favorite athleisure wear because, for starters, its as comfortable as can be. They are presentable and are fitted, so I can still look professional as a fitness professional. The 5 Year Basic Tee is one of my favorites because its super comfortable, but also a fitted t-shirt. It’s stretchy, so it hugs your body just right, and if it feels too tight, you can stretch it out a little before putting it on, and it will fit great.”

After the Second World War, the emergence in Paris of the luxurious "New Look" popularised by Christian Dior, with its emphasis on accessorising and femininity, was in direct contrast to the relaxed, easy-wear American look.[26] Sally Kirkland, a fashion editor at Vogue and LIFE, noted that McCardell and others had already been thinking along the lines of longer and fuller skirts and fitted bodices, but that unlike Dior's heavily stiffened and corseted designs, they used bias-cut bodices and lightweight, easy-wear circle or pleated skirts to reproduce the same silhouette.[22] Unlike traditional made-to-measure French couture fashion, designed for specific silhouettes, American sportswear was designed to accommodate a variety of body shapes and enable freedom of movement.[26] With the lifting of fabric rationing and restrictions following the War, American designers were able to use unlimited fabric and the development of permanent pleating meant that pleated dresses and full skirts were easy to look after.[22] In addition to this, American stores had begun to recognise the commercial value of separates, with LIFE reporting in 1949 that separates made up an all-time-high of 30% of clothing sales in the States that Fall.[22]


“Nike makes a great training short that I own every color in because I like them so much! These Flex shorts are fitted but also have a stretch in them, so they’re not restrictive when I’m squatting or performing other hip bending movements. Since I train a lot with a barbell, I look for gear that is not going to fade or deteriorate from the bar rubbing against it, over and over. These shorts have proven to be worthy for training in my opinion.”
In a 1974 essay titled "Recession Dressing," the writer Kennedy Fraser noted how Halston's work, particularly his success with making basic garments in luxurious fabrics, was that of an "anti-designer" who liberated American women of fashion from needlessly elaborate, conventional high fashion from high-end establishment American designers. She also singled out Clovis Ruffin and Stephen Burrows.[40] Alongside Calvin Klein, Jhane Barnes, and Ralph Lauren, Martin has described Halston, Ruffin and Burrows as "paragons" of 1970s and early 1980s Seventh Avenue sportswear style.[4]

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Un sweat est fait pour rendre vos temps libres aussi confortables que possible, mais ça ne veut pas dire que vous ne pouvez pas à la fois être élégant et suivre les dernières tendances. Les pulls à capuchon et les capuchons à zip sont intemporels et fonctionnels, alors que les tee-shirts ultralégers à capuche vous permettent d’exprimer votre côté créatif à travers des imprimés graphiques. Restez au chaud lors des soirées plus fraîches avec des sweats qui se coordonnent avec tout, des jeans skinny jusqu’aux leggings douillets. Vous n’avez pas non plus besoin de porter le même toutes les fins de semaine ; l’assortiment de Simons est en évolution constante pour rester en phase avec la mode. 
You might be more familiar with No Bull’s pricey lifting shoes, but did you know they make apparel, too? The brand identifies its target consumer as one who trains hard and doesn't have time for excuses, insisting that its gear will show up if you do, but it can’t show up for you. The clothes are everything you need to workout, and nothing you don’t.
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Sportswear has been called America's main contribution to the history of fashion design,[1] developed to cater to the needs of the increasingly fast-paced lifestyle of American women.[2] It started out as a fashion industry term describing informal and interchangeable separates (i.e., blouses, shirts, skirts and shorts),[2] and in the 1920s became a popular word for relaxed, casual wear typically worn for spectator sports.[1] Since the 1930s the term has been used to describe both day and evening fashions of varying degrees of formality that demonstrate this relaxed approach while remaining appropriate wear for many business or social occasions.[3]
During the 1970s, Lauren, Calvin Klein and Perry Ellis became particularly known for their sportswear designs, made in all-natural fibres such as wool, combed cotton, and linen, which placed them at the top tier of American fashion design alongside the Anne Klein label (designed by Donna Karan and Louis Dell'Olio).[22] Newsweek in 1975 described Calvin Klein as having styled his clean, casual separates with the authority of a couture designer, and by 1985, Martin described him as "one of the great American stylists" with a solid international reputation and worldwide influence entirely based on his skills as a sportswear designer.[4] The industry empires of Lauren and Calvin Klein would be joined in the mid-1980s by Donna Karan's own-name label and Tommy Hilfiger, each of whom created distinctive wardrobes for the American woman based upon stylish but wearable, comfortable and interchangeable multi-purpose clothes that combined practicability with luxury.[2] These clothes were also designed to have a long, stylish and undated life, rather than to only be fashionable for one season.[4] In 1976, the designer Zoran brought out the first of a number of collections of extremely simple garments made of the finest quality fabrics; garments that barely changed over the years and which became cult objects to his wealthy clientele.[41] In 1993, the fashion journalist Suzy Menkes declared Zoran's less-is-more sportswear prophetic of the early 1990s modernist trend, whilst Zoran stated that the work of Calvin Klein, Karan, and the Anne Klein label epitomised the "comfort, simplicity, and practicality" associated with sportswear.[41] Most early 21st century sportswear design follows in the footsteps of these designers.[2] Other notable sportswear designers of the late 20th century include Norma Kamali, whose 1980s fashionable garments made from sweatshirt fabric were highly influential;[4][22] Marc Jacobs, whose eponymous label renowned for layered informality in both day and evening wear was founded in 1986, and Isaac Mizrahi, who presented his first collection in 1987.[2]
Une fois que vous avez fait le plein de sweats à capuchon neutres basiques, de cardigans zips et de sweats tuniques surdimensionnés, affinez encore davantage votre look! Épousez la tendance avec la mode des épaules dénudées ou des manches à volants, ou choisissez de faire une déclaration audacieuse en affichant un slogan amusant ou provocateur. Optez pour le vintage avec des sweats à logo graphique comme Wrengler, Reebok et adidas, ou mettez simplement de l’avant votre style excentrique avec un imprimé Snoopy ou Wonder Woman. Bien sûr, être décontractée ne veut pas dire faire mauvaise impression – assurez-vous de choisir des coupes flatteuses dans lesquelles vous vous sentez non seulement confortable, mais aussi sûre de vous.
Among the key designs produced by this new generation of American designers were capsule wardrobes such as McCardell's group of five wool jersey pieces from 1934, comprising two tops, long and short skirts, and a pair of culottes; and Maxwell's "weekend wardrobe" of five tweed and flannel garments. Both were designed to accommodate formal and informal occasions depending on how they were assembled and accessorised.[22] McCardell also became well known for designs such as the Monastic and Popover dresses which were versatile enough to work in multiple contexts from swimsuit cover-ups to party dresses.[22][25] Other McCardell signatures included ballet slippers (made by Ben Sommers of Capezio) as everyday footwear and functional pockets in skirts and trousers.[22][26] Dressy garments made from casual fabrics, such as McCardell and Joset Walker's evening dresses and dress-and-coat ensembles made out of cotton, became a key sportswear look.[22] The American couturier Norman Norell declared that McCardell could make a smart dress to wear anywhere out of "five dollars worth of common cotton calico."[22] Other sportswear designs often incorporated elements of sporty informal or casual wear, as exemplified by Clare Potter's evening sweater worn with a long skirt draped like a sidesaddle riding habit.[27]

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As more generic, versatile sportswear became more prominent in the Paris collections, the press increasingly promoted the wearing of such garments in an everyday context.[12] By the mid-1920s, American advertisers also began actively pushing the idea that sporty clothing was just as appropriate for regular daywear as it was for active pursuits, presenting it as the epitome of modernity and the American ideal.[8] One advertisement put out by Abercrombie & Fitch in Vogue in 1929 suggested that while men might admire a girl in an glamorous evening gown, they would be less intimidated by her approachable, friendly appearance in good-quality sportswear.[8][14] Sportswear was also presented as an accessible version of resort wear, a term for the luxurious travelling clothing and holiday wear worn by those who could afford a leisurely lifestyle with multiple vacations, such as cruises, yachting, and skiing.[8] Affordable, well-designed all-American sportswear was presented as a way of enabling a less wealthy customer to feel part of that same lifestyle.[8] However, at first, American apparel firms mostly copied French styles.[15][16]
“I enjoy wearing Lululemon gear. My favorite piece is their Metal Tech Vent long sleeve shirts. I'm a fan of long sleeve workout tops and this particular shirt fits perfectly around the body and arms. It allows me to move without any restriction and it also feels good—which are my top two most important qualifications for workout gear. Not to mention, I like how it looks on me.”
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